Monday, July 4, 2016

EYE IN THE SKY – Movie Review

THE COST OF WAR

Temecula, CA – In our last 4th of July weekend trio of stories, we look at one of Dandy Don's main peeves and vote getters – the Bush/Obama War. The War on Terror is a Pandora's Box that just keeps on giving. It could be called a rainbow of deceit and every color has been looked at here in our annals of the Full Value Review and the Temecula Calendar. One effect that gets overlooked in total, is the cost of war.

We see what the US is doing to multiple factions on various continents through smart bomb footage or still pictures of the aftermath, and we see the use of learned war tricks, like breaking a man's back by doubling his legs over now used on [future] death lotto winners [average payout $6M, to the fam], but what is the real cost of war? The cost to the winning side?


Now playing in its last week but definitely worth a look see at the Temeku [the cheap show], is Eye In The Sky, a taut political thriller a lot more subtle than Jason Bourne. As fresh as today's headlines about the global war on terror and their allies through use of drone warfare and local spies, the story conflict is explored through the emotions experienced by all those involved, including you, the audience member.

It would be easy to dismiss this film as another Crash, except by definition, Crash now seems too Hollywood next to 'Eye'. EITS doesn't build in the usual roller-coaster fashion along the style of most dramas. EITS starts on a flat course on a slight angle, then elevates sharply upward, tracking each person involved emotions, ethics, and finally, by the conclusion of the film, a brief look at the toll each pays in bringing the story of their character arc through the ensemble situation.

Rather than a definitive lead or hero, it is the main plot point that drives the film's tension, nailed in place by subtle nuances from talented craftsmen and women applying their art to make the story as real and believable as possible. Shot on location, several in fact, to cement that global feel but having most of the action on the ground done in Somalia [subbing for Kenya], adds that layer of just the right amount of realism to a plot that involves the old ticking bomb under the table [Hitchcock].

However, it is when the smokes clears that we, the audience, get to see the real costs of this Bush-Obama 'war on terror' that currently clocks in about 22 vets a day committing suicide.

One final note, this is one of the two final roles the late, great Alan Rickman had in the can when he passed away. To see him here is not to see someone ill, he stayed a great actor right to the end.

Now through Thursday night at the Temeku, also available on DVD and Blueray.

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